Cost-Cutting Tips for Freelancers

Freelancer

If you do freelance work, you already know that being self-employed gives you incredible flexibility and freedom, but you’ve got to operate like a well-oiled machine if you want to be successful. You’re running your own business, so use these cost-cutting tips to keep expenses low and your profits healthy.

Free is Key

The beauty of freelancing is that you don’t need an office. Working from home, the coffee shop, the park, or the library - they’re all options for you. Find free wi-fi and a good cell, and you’re all set. Every dollar that goes out is one less dollar that stays in your pocket as profit. This is the mindset you need to have all the time when you work for yourself.

Start Tracking

Unless you’re a freelance accountant, you probably try to spend as little time on financials as possible. But this is the lifeblood of your business, so you need a system that will help you track expenses, invoicing, and receivables. It’s easy to waste money, especially if it’s going out in small amounts. Get a grip on how much you really spend, and it’ll be easy to identify costs that aren’t worth it.

Continue reading
  1087 Hits
1087 Hits

Finance Tips for Millennials

Millennials

Millennials approach life very differently than generations before them. And while that’s true of every young, up-and-coming generation, finance tips for millennials have changed dramatically compared to only a few years ago because of how they want to live their lives. Sometimes they get a bad rap, but new ways of solving problems are always a good thing.

Prioritize Your Life

Saving for retirement is not the goal for many millennials. It’s way off in the future, pensions are a pipe dream of the past, and there’s disillusionment in the air about what will be waiting after 50 or 60 years of hard work. Millennials want to enjoy life now, and they like the good life. But that doesn’t mean they’re financially irresponsible. You need money to accomplish these goals, and millennials are finding alternative ways to fund a lifestyle of fun and travel.

Create Passive Income

The idea of your money making money or earning money without much effort isn’t new. That’s why investing in the stock market or real estate has always had appeal. But the reality for most people is that they pick up extra work or side hustles when they need cash. That helps, but you’re limited by your time and skills. Millennials are finding new ways to create passive income streams.

Continue reading
  846 Hits
846 Hits

Can You Refinance Student Loans When You’re Self-Employed?

Savings Finances Economy

Freedom, flexibility, and control are some of the biggest reasons people to choose to work for themselves. But if you’re self-employed, how does it affect approval if you want to refinance your student loans? Good question. You can do it, but it’s not always easy.

Unpredictable Income

One of the hardest things to get used to when you work for yourself is fluctuating income. It’s the perfect time to reduce your student loan payments or pay off your debt more quickly by refinancing. The problem is that it’s not always easy to find a lender who works with self-employed individuals. That’s why short-term loans are so common with entrepreneurs.

Understand the Process

Be sure you understand your loan situation. Refinancing may or may not be a good idea. Federal student loans have some unique benefits attached, like special income-driven repayment plans, so you could lose out on those by refinancing with a private lender. You should also know that many don’t work with self-employed clients.

Continue reading
  961 Hits
961 Hits

Investing Mistakes to Avoid

Savings Finances Economy

The key to building wealth is to follow a strategy and avoid making investment mistakes wherever you can. You may not think of yourself as rich, but putting your money to work for you is the secret to amassing the wealth and savings you’ve only dreamed about. If you can avoid these mistakes and misconceptions, you’ll be well on your way:

Not Saving Money

While investing is a surefire way to increase your wealth, it’s also vital to have a savings strategy that not only puts money aside for your investment accounts, but provides a cash flow cushion. If you consciously save a set amount each month, that means you’re on top of your expenditures and budget, and that’s a good place to be. Your goal is to avoid the stress of credit card debt while putting money away for investing at the same time.

Maintaining Social Media Status

With people constantly oversharing their latest luxury purchases and grand vacations on social media, it’s easy to want to keep up. If you develop the habit of buying certain brands, spending more than you can afford, and acting like you have more money than you actually do, it will wreak havoc on your budget and cripple your investment ability. Don’t compare your results to anyone except yourself.

Continue reading
  1219 Hits
1219 Hits

How to Organize Your Wallet

Man With a Wallet

Let’s talk about how to organize your wallet. What does yours look like? Is it bulging with receipts and scraps? Does it need a little TLC? These questions are designed to get you thinking. Your wallet is an excellent metaphor for the way you handle your personal finances and an expression of your respect for money. Let’s get down to business and get it organized, so you can take a renewed approach to the way you control and spend your cash.

Empty Your Wallet

Open up your wallet, and pull everything out. Chances are, it’s pretty dirty and filled with things you no longer need. If you need a new wallet, now’s the time to replace it with something fresh and new. As for what was inside, file any receipts you might need to save, such as medical or business expenses. Cut up any credit cards that you don’t truly need. Trash anything that’s out of date, like expired identification cards or business cards you don’t want.

Categorize Your Stuff

Next, group your items so you can find them easily. Put credit cards together, cash sorted by denomination and facing the same direction, and gift cards in one place. Medical insurance cards, business cards, library cards, and other things like that can go in a separate area so they don’t get mixed up. Create a designated place to hold business receipts to be expensed, if those are something you need to track.

Continue reading
  1159 Hits
1159 Hits

What is a CPA?

Certified Public Accountant

If you’ve heard of a CPA, you probably know it means some type of accountant. But what is a CPA, really? Why is it an important distinction from your average accountant at the office? Let’s take a look at who CPAs are and what they do.

Certified Public Accountants

CPAs, or Certified Public Accountants, are more than just traditional accountants. They exist to help businesses of all sizes grow and flourish. CPAs are knowledgeable in all aspects of business finance, so they can help with everything from analysis and financial statements, to complicated forensic accounting and tax planning. Between their education, credentials, and experience, they’re qualified to do a lot more than run reports and balance checking accounts.

CPA Requirements

It’s not easy to become a CPA. Besides a college degree in accounting, they have the real-world business and financial experience it takes to put concepts to work. In order to get a CPA certification, candidates must pass the Uniform CPA Examination, which is an exhaustive test managed by the American Institute of CPAs. Believe it or not, it’s been around since 1896! The exam includes multiple choice questions, written communication tasks, and simulations of real scenarios on a variety of subjects. Needless to say, it’s highly challenging. The average passing rate in 2015 was a little less than 50%, so it’s a grueling undertaking. The CPA exam takes a lot of preparation, along with the experience and mindset that’s needed to be able to perform in the field. The last step in becoming a CPA is to get licensed by the Boards of Accountancy for the particular geographic location.

Continue reading
  975 Hits
975 Hits

Pick the Right Tax Preparer

Couple With Tax Preparer

Ever-changing tax laws and confusing deductions are just two reasons why you need to pick the right tax preparer. If a professional is involved, you can feel more confident that you’re doing it right and you won’t face an audit anytime soon.

Where to Begin?

Before you just go with your friend’s accountant, consider your options and know this: you’re legally responsible for every piece of information on your tax return, no matter who completes the paperwork. You need to feel 100% comfortable with providing your personal information, financial data, and social security number.

Find a Qualified Professional

  • Certified Public Accountants - A CPA is an accounting professional who has met licensing criteria and passed a professional qualifying exam for your state. CPAs are allowed to represent you in the event of an IRS audit or other conflict. Questions to ask: Do you prepare individual returns? Do you take continuing education classes? What are your fees?
  • Tax Attorneys - If you’re in a unique situation, such as a tax dispute, audit scenario, or need a complex tax shelter, then a tax attorney is the right resource for you. However, this is an expensive option. Questions to ask: What is your specialty? How much do you charge?
  • Enrolled Agents - An EA has passed an exhaustive exam and received a license from the IRS. Although an EA is less expensive than a CPA, be certain the specialty is in the area you need. Questions to ask: What is your focus? What are your tax preparation fees?
  • Voluntary Annual Filing Season Tax Preparers - The IRS allows people to get certified for tax preparation by completing a specified curriculum. Questions to ask: What’s your experience? Do you have references? How much do you charge?
  • PTIN Holders - Some tax preparers don’t maintain a professional license or participate in the Annual Filing Season Program, but they have an active preparer tax identification number through the IRS. As long as this number is active, it’s legal for them to prepare tax returns. Questions to ask: What is your tax preparation background? How long have you been in business? What fees do you charge?

The Internet is Your Friend

Once you’ve identified a potential tax preparer, use online resources like the IRS’s website, your state’s Bar Association, and the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy to make sure your provider is listed and doesn’t have any disciplinary actions or license issues.

Continue reading
  939 Hits
939 Hits

Surprising Tax Deductions

Goverment Taxes Payday

It’s that time of year again - tax time! These surprising tax deductions can help reduce your taxable income and cut your bill to the IRS. If you’re savvy about your taxes, you can save money and avoid cash flow issues.

Family Expenditures

  • Health Insurance - If you’re self-employed and buy your own private health insurance, you’ve noticed the skyrocketing premiums. You can deduct up to 100% of these costs off of your total gross income, and, if your medical expenses add up to more than 7.5 percent of your adjusted gross income, you can itemize those, too.
  • Sales Tax - Did you know you have the option of deducting either sales taxes or state income taxes from your federal income tax? So, if you’re lucky enough to live in a state that doesn’t have its own income tax, you can itemize sales tax as a deduction.
  • Babysitters - If your babysitter is working while you volunteer for a known charity, you can list the cost as a charitable contribution.
  • Charity - Speaking of charities, you may be able to itemize out-of-pocket expenses related to any charity work, like food and drinks served at a fundraiser, in addition to money or goods donated.
  • Education - The Lifetime Learning credit offers deductions of up to $2,000 per year on education expenses after high school. There are specific requirements based on income level, but it’s open to people of all ages.

Work-Related Expenditures

  • Social Security - If you’re self-employed, you already know you have to pay 15.3 percent of your income to the U.S. Government for social security and medicare taxes. The good news is you can deduct 7.65 percent off your income taxes, the amount typically covered by an employer.
  • Business Expenses - All business expenses, no matter how off the wall, can be deducted from your business income as long as you can document how they benefit your company. So make sure you account for every single business expense you make.
  • Teaching Expenses - It’s a well-known fact that teachers spend a lot of their own money on classroom supplies. If you’re a K-12 teacher, you can deduct up to $250 from your income for expenditures on materials.
  • Job Search - Finding a job can get expensive, between the cost of printing resumes, posting on job search websites, and driving to interviews. If you lose your job and are looking for one in the same field, you can deduct any expenses over 2 percent of your adjusted gross income.
  979 Hits
979 Hits

Learn the Latest Tax Scams to Avoid

Thief Robbing US Dollars

Even if you've heard about tax scams of the past, you may want to pay attention to the latest tax scams to avoid. Scammers constantly come up with brand new ways to part you and your hard-earned dollar, but just a little research can keep you from making a costly mistake. Learn the current tax scams to avoid, and spread the word!

Telephone Scams

If you receive a phone call from an angry IRS agent, what should you do? Remain calm, and be skeptical. Many scammers have found ways to manipulate caller ID services, so the call appears to come from an IRS office. They threaten the caller with arrest or deportation, adding insults and hostility for maximum emotional effect. Some scammers even use video relay services (VRS) to take advantage of the deaf and hard of hearing. This unprofessional behavior is not protocol for the IRS, and you should not give out your personal information over the phone.

Email and Malware

While there are many legitimate tax services online, it's important to do your research to avoid a scam. Here are just a few of the common online tax scams to avoid:

Continue reading
  1073 Hits
1073 Hits

Learn How to Pay Off Holiday Debt

Young Family Having Debts

The holidays are times of great joy, but what happens after the festivities are over? You may find yourself staring at your credit card bill while wondering just what happened. Luckily, it's not hard to figure out how to pay off holiday debt. We'll walk you through some of the most effective strategies to eliminate your debt, so you can start the new year with a plan for success.

Smart Budgeting

When debt is looming, it's time to budget! Nowadays, it's easier than ever to budget effectively. Of course, you can always try the tried-and-true paper and pencil method. Write out all of your monthly expenses, write out your monthly income, and look for places to cut. But, you can also try free budgeting apps to manage your money with just a click. You might find that you just need to cut luxuries like take-out or shopping trips for a few months, but you may need to make other adjustments to pay off holiday debt faster. Consider canceling some recurring monthly subscriptions to free up extra space in the budget.

The Snowball Method

Have you heard of the snowball method? This strategy was created by financial expert, Dave Ramsay, to help defeat multiple debts. First, write out all the holiday debts that you need to pay off in order from smallest to largest. This is your list of attack. Pay off your smallest debt completely, and then move onto the next one on the list. This allows you to get the manageable debts out of the way before moving onto the more intimidating sums. Combined with smart budgeting, this can be a great way to systematically pay off multiple debts.

Continue reading
  797 Hits
797 Hits

By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://www.cashmaxtexas.com/